Shanti, New Zealand

“Don’t get me wrong – reaching the Cruz de Ferro and spotting the Cathedral de Santiago for the first time were numinous, reflective moments that felt bloody amazing. But for me, the Camino was rather slow burn of comprehension that if I can walk across a country on my own two feet carrying everything I needed, I can do anything I want.”

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“Eighteen months on from the Camino, I still think about the Camino on an almost daily basis. To be completely honest, at the time I didn’t think the camino taught me anything drastically new. During my trek, I spent a month waiting for a flash of insight, an intense realisation, or one of those important moments of self discovery that everyone else seemed to be experiencing.

Don’t get me wrong – reaching the Cruz de Ferro and spotting the Cathedral de Santiago for the first time were numinous, reflective moments that felt bloody amazing. But for me, the Camino was rather slow burn of comprehension that if I can walk across a country on my own two feet carrying everything I needed, I can do anything I want.

There’s something beautiful about the simplistic complexity of the Camino. Waking up each day with the single aim of walking is in so many ways difficult yet at the same time uncomplicated.”

-Shanti, New Zealand | Travel and hiking blogger at “A Wanderphile.”

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